Cheddar Chive Scones

Cheddar Chive Scones

Scones are one of the easiest types of quick bread to make so over the next couple of weeks we’re going to share two of our favourite scone recipes – one savoury, and one sweet! These Cheddar Chive Scones are the perfect savoury scone to highlight the fresh spring chives that are springing up.

This recipe is very quick to put together and makes 8 pieces. They are the perfect scone to serve with soup or salad or to eat all by themselves with some butter. We dare you to eat only one!

Cheddar Chive Scones

 

Cheddar Chive Scones
Serves 8
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238 calories
27 g
74 g
11 g
8 g
6 g
75 g
171 g
2 g
0 g
4 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
75g
Servings
8
Amount Per Serving
Calories 238
Calories from Fat 97
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 11g
17%
Saturated Fat 6g
32%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 74mg
25%
Sodium 171mg
7%
Total Carbohydrates 27g
9%
Dietary Fiber 1g
4%
Sugars 2g
Protein 8g
Vitamin A
8%
Vitamin C
1%
Calcium
16%
Iron
4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups all-purpose flour
  2. 2 tsp baking powder
  3. 1/4 tsp salt (increase to 1/2 tsp if using unsalted butter)
  4. 1 tbsp sugar
  5. 1/4 cup cold butter, grated*
  6. 2 large eggs, beaten
  7. 1/3 cup buttermilk
Add-ins
  1. 3/4 cups cheddar cheese, shredded
  2. 2 tbsp chives, choped
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl and mix together well.
  3. Combine the grated butter and wet ingredients in a small bowl.
  4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and combine to form a shaggy dough.
  5. Fold in the cheddar cheese and chives.
  6. Turn out dough onto a floured surface and form into a circle 6-8" in diameter and about 1-1.5" thick. Cut into 8 pieces and transfer to baking sheet.
  7. Bake for 12-15 minutes and remove from oven when they have a golden brown bottom.
Notes
  1. If the dough seems to dry, feel free to add a splash more of buttermilk.
  2. *Use a cheese grater to grate the butter to more evenly distribute it throughout the dough
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calories
238
fat
11g
protein
8g
carbs
27g
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Creating a Cheese Tray

Creating a Cheese Tray

At any kind of party, there is really nothing better than a fabulous cheese tray.  With the beginning of May, comes endless brunches, barbeques, and spring and summer nights in which a cheese tray could do no wrong.

Here are a few simple ideas that can help make your cheese tray appealing to ALL of your senses:

  • It is always best to go for a wide variety of cheeses: this means you want some hard and soft cheeses.  You also want a variety of tastes: play around with mild, strong, and smoked cheeses.  These will provide some visual interest as well.
  • Cheese is not the only thing that goes on a cheese tray – add some grapes or some nuts, like walnuts and almonds to add some texture.
  • To take your cheese tray to the next level, add some salami or prosciutto, and some olives to make it more of a charcuterie board. 

The next thing you need is some sort of vessel, to get the cheese to your mouth.  My #1 go-to is the cracker!  The options are endless in the cracker aisle, so feel free to go crazy with flavour here.  If you don’t love the cracker like I do, a baguette or a ciabatta loaf will do nicely as well.

Creating a Cheese Tray  

For the cheese tray above, we used brie, edam, a double smoked cheddar, and a jalapeno monterey jack.  Using a ciabatta as our bread, and some nuts, dried fruit, and grapes to break it up with some texture and colour.  Other cheeses you could use could be marble cheddar, goat cheese, blue cheese, or a crotonese.  An Italian crotonese is a very hard, crumbly cheese with a similar nutty taste and smell to parmesan.

To help you create your own wonderful cheese tray, here are a few helpful tips!

Cheese Tray Cheat Cheet

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Spinach Salad with Raspberry Dressing

Having a go-to potluck worthy salad in your repertoire in always a great idea. Not only can you prepare it in a pinch but if you always have the required ingredients in your kitchen, you can make it any time you need. This spinach salad with a raspberry dressing is packed with flavour and contains many ingredients that you may already have on hand in your kitchen.

Spinach Salad with Raspberry Dressing

This salad is also incredibly versatile and can be made with any combination of veggies you might find in your fridge. The dressing we created for this salad is made using pureed raspberries, making it 400% fancier than any other dressing you could buy at the store! We always have frozen raspberries in our freezer and combined with a few other pantry staples you can create a restaurant worthy dressing in a split second!

Spinach Salad with Raspberry Dressing

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Spinach Salad with Raspberry Dressing
This spinach salad with a raspberry dressing is packed with flavour and contains many ingredients that you may already have on hand in your kitchen.
Course Salads
Servings
Ingredients
Salad
Dressing
Course Salads
Servings
Ingredients
Salad
Dressing
Instructions
  1. Mash up raspberries to form a puree. Combine in a mason jar with the other dressing ingredients and set aside.
  2. Combine salad ingredients in a large bowl.
  3. Shake up your dressing to ensure it's mixed and serve it with the finished spinach salad.
Recipe Notes
  • You can add or substitute any of the vegetables in the salad for what you have available in your fridge.
  • Feel free to roast the pecans before adding them to your salad.
  • Store your leafy greens properly to get the most out of them.
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Pasta Salad

Pasta Salad

There is no better way to enjoy fresh seasonal veggies than by eating them in a salad, and the best way to enjoy a salad is by adding pasta to it.  Pasta salad is one of my favourite summer side dishes.  It is incredibly versatile and you can put any vegetable you want in it.

 

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Pasta Salad
Course Salads, Side Dish
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Pasta Salad
Dressing
Course Salads, Side Dish
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Pasta Salad
Dressing
Instructions
Pasta Salad
  1. Bring a large pot with salted water to boil. Cook pasta according to package instructions. Rotini will take about 8-10 minutes for an al dente finish.
  2. Shred carrots and chop green onions. Prep all your vegetables for the salad: wash, core and seed, and chop. If using broccoli, the salad will turn out better if the broccoli is steamed for 2-3 minutes.
  3. Once the pasta is cooked, drain and cool until room temperature. You can just leave the pasta until it's cooled, or to finish quicker, you can run some cold water over the pasta until it's a good temperature.
  4. Combine all ingredients in large bowl.
Dressing
  1. Whisk all ingredients together in small bowl or measuring cup. When salad has been combined, dress the salad and mix thoroughly. If desired, crumble some feta cheese over the top.
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How to Store Leafy Greens

How to Store Leafy Greens

I don’t know about you, but too often I’ve bought a bag or container of spinach only to have half of it rot on me in the fridge. After learning few tips and tricks I’m able to better store my leafy greens to save money and extend their shelf life.

Today we’re going to share some of our favourite tips and tricks we’ve learned along the way for how to store leafy greens. When we use the term ‘leafy greens’ we’re talking about any leaf type produce, including: spinach, all types of lettuce, kale, Swiss chard, and beet tops. Whether from your own garden or the store, leafy greens should be stored properly to extend their shelf life and save you money!

Storage Temperature

We keep all of our leafy greens stored in the fridge. Warmer, room-temperatures are the perfect place for greens to start the rotting process. They are already very delicate and cooler fridge temperatures help them to last longer.

Air Flow

Another important thing to remember is air flow. Lots of air flow is necessary or the greens will start to rot in their packaging. There are a few ways you can increase air flow around your leafy greens:

  • Using vegetable produce bags (Ziploc brand). They have small holes in the bag to allow the greens to breathe. Avoid adding overly wet vegetables to these or the liquid will come through (think: tomatoes).
  • Keep greens in the bag they come in but cut the top off and ‘plump’ the bag to give the greens more room. Many of the bags you buy greens in are already breathable.
  • Keep greens in the plastic box-type container they came in. These boxes also have holes that provide some airflow. Be sure the leaves don’t get packed in or they will begin to rot underneath.

How to Store Leafy Greens

Moisture Control

Finally, controlling any excess moisture will help to extend the shelf life of your favourite greens. Excess moisture will collect on leaves and create a perfect place for them to start rotting. Adequate air flow helps eliminate moisture, but you can also adding a piece of paper towel to absorb any excess moisture or use a towel to dry off heartier leaves like kale or romaine lettuce. If you like to wash your greens before you put them in the fridge make sure they are dry before you store them!

How to Store Leafy Greens

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Ham and Leek Quiche

Ham and Leek Quiche

With spring now upon us, we get to enjoy a whole new crop of vegetables.  Leeks are a great spring vegetable which can be used in many different ways.  Here, we have developed a very tasty quiche that you can use them in, as well as your leftover Easter ham.

 

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Ham and Leek Quiche
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 55 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Pastry
Filling
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 55 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Pastry
Filling
Instructions
Pastry
  1. Sift together flour and salt in a large bowl. Add shortening and cut into dry mixture with pastry cutter or two knives. The mixture should resemble coarse crumbs.
  2. In a small bowl, beat together egg, vinegar, and cold water. Add to the flour mixture and stir together roughly with a fork so it comes together. You don't want to work the pastry too much; it's okay if it looks a bit shaggy when you're finished bringing it together.
  3. Flour your work surface and turn out the pastry. Cut in half and work with one half at a time. Roll until pastry is about 1/4 inch thick. Once the pastry is rolled out, carefully use the rolling pin to transfer it into the pie plate. Gently press the pastry into the edges of the plate and leave any extra around the edges until it has been filled. The pastry is quite resilient, so if it cracks it can easily be repaired simply by bringing the two edges together and pressing. The key is to move as quickly as possible - you don't want to leave the pastry on the counter for too long once it has been rolled.
Filling
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F.
  2. Once the pastry is ready, prepare your leeks. Wash and trim the dark green leaves. Slice thinly, about 1/8" thick, and saute over medium low heat until softened. This may take about 10-15 minutes and you can add some salt to draw out excess moisture. This will reduce the chances of your quiche turning out soggy.
  3. Prepare ham by trimming excess fat and chopping into 1/2" pieces. The bottom of the pastry should be well covered with ham.
  4. Break eggs into a bowl and add milk. Whisk together very well. You don't want any little pieces of yolk visible in the mixture. Season with freshly ground pepper. You can trim the edge of the pastry now, if needed.
  5. Once leeks are finished, add to the pie plate and pour egg mixture over top. Place pie plate onto a cookie sheet, just in case the quiche bubbles over. Slide into oven and bake for 50-55 minutes. The filling will be set, but not solid. It should be a light golden brown on top and the pastry will be golden around the edges.
Recipe Notes

The pastry recipe is good for 2-9-inch pie crusts.  Any extra pie crust can be stored in the fridge (up to 1 week) or freezer (up to 1 month), until you are ready to use it.

 

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All About Asparagus

Spring has sprung and so has the asparagus!

Asparagus is one of the first vegetables grown in Manitoba to actually be ready for harvest. It’s picked in the spring (typically May-June) and if you head over to your local grocery store in the spring months you may even find some from your local farms! It’s also during these spring months when asparagus is at its most reasonable price.

When buying asparagus I like to look for thinner stalks because they are often more tender and less woody. I also like to look for bunches of all the same or almost the same diameter so that they all cook in about the same time.

A note on frozen asparagus: as with most veggies we would recommend buying frozen when asparagus is out of season. Frozen varieties are just as healthy as fresh and also usually a better price, especially when asparagus is not in season. Always take a quick minute at the grocery store to compare prices!

Storage

Store asparagus upright in some water in the fridge. You may notice that this is how they’re actually kept in some grocery stores. The container in the photograph below is great, it’s tall and can hold more than one bunch if necessary. This particular one is from Ikea but any tall container, including wide mouth mason jars will work.

Asparagus Storage

How to Prepare

Easy Steam or Boil Asparagus

  1. Remove about half an inch of the ends.
  2. Cut into small pieces, halves, or leave whole.
  3. Add to steamer or steamer basket with a few inches of water underneath, or directly into a pot of water.
  4. Steam or boil for 3-5 minutes. Be careful not to over cook or your asparagus will be mushy!
  5. Toss with about 1 tsp canola oil and a pinch of salt and pepper.

Steamed Asparagus

Easy Roasted Asparagus

  1. Remove about half an inch of the ends.
  2. Toss asparagus with canola oil and a pinch of salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  3. Spread out onto a baking sheet and top with 2-3 slices of lemon.
  4. Roast at 375F for 10-15 minutes. Roasted Asparagus
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What you wanted to know about Whole Grains

With the help of our new readers, we have some great questions for you.  We have also added some more information about whole grains that you may have been wondering about.  If there is still something that you want to know about, please let us know!  We are more than happy to answer your questions.

So, here’s what you wanted to know:

What ARE whole grains? 

To put it simply, whole grains are the fruits of grasses.  They contain all the carbohydrates and protein needed for the plant to grow.  Humans, however, have harvested these grains for our own nutritional and health needs.  A whole grain contains all essential nutrients for the plant to grow.  In most cases, whole grains are made up of three different parts: the bran, the germ and the endosperm, with each part containing different nutrients.  For example, the endosperm is primarily carbohydrates and the bran contains fats.  If you want the biggest nutritional punch, then your best option is whole grains.

What is the difference between sprouted grains and non-sprouted grains?

The main difference between sprouted and non-sprouted grains is that sprouted grains are allowed to germinate (i.e. start to grow a new plant). Grain kernels can do this because they are really the seeds of a plant. These sprouted grains are then dried and then flour can be milled from the whole grains. Products made with sprouted grains may have more nutrients in them (compared to non-whole grain products), but this may only be because they use the whole grain to make their products. No scientific research exists to suggest they are superior in any way.   

What’s the difference between whole grain and multigrain?

Whole grain products are different than multi-grain products because they will contain the whole grain: bran, endosperm, and germ. Multi-grain products don’t necessarily contain all parts of the grain, but rather the product contains several types of grains.  If you are interested in purchasing multi-grain products, look for items that indicate that they are also whole-grain. Multi-grain products are not always healthier, despite the label!

What’s the best kind of bread to buy? 

The answer to this question depends on a few different things.  For example, do you eat bread only for enjoyment?  Do you want some nutritional benefit from your bread?  Does texture affect your enjoyment of the bread?  Let me answer these all separately.  If you eat bread only for enjoyment, then the best would be a lovely crusty country-style bread with a soft interior.  It could be a sourdough or it could be a baguette.  These are excellent to enjoy with some cheese, jam, or simply by themselves.  Now, if you would like some nutritional benefit from your bread, then the grainier breads are definitely the way to go.  When looking at these breads, label reading is key.  If you want maximum nutrition, look at the ingredient list: this will tell you if the grains are whole, or if they have been previously milled to get a flour that has been baked into the bread.  One grain to watch out for will be flax.  While whole flax is definitely an excellent source of fibre, if it is ground before being incorporated into the bread, it is a potential source of omega 3s.  If texture affects your enjoyment, then I suggest exercising some caution while you are perusing the bread aisle.  Here, again, learning how to read labels will be a great help.  Having said all this, there is a middle ground.  You can have a great crusty sourdough that has seeds and grains in it.  It really depends what you look for in your bread.

Can you make risotto with barley?

Yes! Typically, a traditional Italian risotto is made with Arborio rice – which is a starchy, white, short grain rice. However, you can make a healthier risotto using barley!

Try this Barley Risotto with Bacon by Chef Michael Smith, this Mushroom Barley Risotto by Epicurious, or this Slow Cooker Squash and Barley Risotto by Chatelaine.

What else can you use puffed wheat for?

Let’s be honest – who doesn’t love a good puffed wheat cake?  It’s like the chocolate-y version of rice krispies!  However, the question still remains – what else can you do with it?  After a search through some of my reference cookbooks yielded little result, I did a quick search on Google and found that puffed wheat is a common, nutritious snack in India.  It can be gently roasted and mixed with various spices and enjoyed when hunger strikes.

What’s the difference between regular rice and par-boil rice?

Parboiled rice (white or brown) differs from regular rice in that it has been partially cooked by being steamed, then dried. This extra processing allows for quicker cooking time later on and increases the nutrient content of the rice

Parboiled rice is more nutritious than regular white rice because its outer layer (hull) has been left on during the steaming process. This allows nutrients from the hull to make their way into the rice kernel. When choosing a rice our favourites in order of most nutritious are: par-boiled brown rice, brown rice, par-boiled white rice, white rice.

What IS gluten?

There is a lot of buzz about gluten these days – not all of it good, but I believe that there are some who don’t know exactly what gluten is.  Without getting too technical, gluten is the protein present in wheat that provides baked goods with stretch, texture, and flavour.  In a baguette, gluten is responsible for the crust and the way it tears when you bite into it.  In a cookie, gluten, literally, causes the cookie to crumble the way it does.

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Grains: Nutrition Comparison

Grains Nutrition Comparison

Different grains and grain products have different nutritional values. Today we’re going to compare some common grains and grain products you might find in your pantry to help decode the differences.

The comparison table below contains several grains and grain products that are common to Canadian kitchens with some relative nutritional information to allow for comparison. This chart shows that some of these products can vary greatly depending on which nutritional aspect you’re looking at.

Flours

Whole wheat flour has more protein, fat, and fibre than white flour. This is because during the milling process much of the wheat kernel is removed creating a product that is more shelf stable and more beneficial for processing. However, this also causes white flour to have less nutrition.

Nutrients and Fibre

Grain products contain more nutrients if they’re whole grains – which means they contain the kernel and the germ, giving the product more fibre and fat soluble vitamins. When choosing grains at the store, select ones that are in their whole, or nearly whole state (i.e. barley or brown rice).

Whole Grain Nutrition

All data is from the Canadian Nutrient Data File; (*) May be contamination, be sure to check the label; (-)Information not available

A note on gluten: Wheat, rye, and barley naturally contain gluten. If you have celiac disease it is important to avoid these grains and products that contain them. Oats may have come in contact with gluten during their milling process so you may need to check labels to find a gluten free variety.

In summary, include a variety of grain and grain products in your diet and try to include more whole grains. Simple switches are a great way to start: try a whole wheat pizza crust or substitute brown rice or barley for white rice. Finally, experiment with new-to-you grains like barley or wild rice.

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What do you want to know about whole grains?

We hope that you have enjoyed our first few posts and learning a little more about whole grains. In addition to several new recipes, you can find information about whole grain storage, the types of wheat products you might find in the grocery store, what to do with barley, and what the difference is between instant and rolled oats in our archive. We hope that we have given you some inspiration and some new ideas to try out in the kitchen.

If there’s something you still want to learn about, or if you have any questions about what we have already shared, please let us know!  We are excited to share more with you, so please ask us anything that comes to mind.  We would love to give you even more information and recipes.

Do you have questions about whole grains? Leave your question below or ask us over social media:

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